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Vintage Clothing Trends

Leather Jackets Aren't Always Black.

Leather Jackets Aren't Always Black.

A sexy leather jacket doesn't always have to be black. This warm chocolate Schott biker hits the mark in every way. Think outside the norm with vintage - style isn't a costume.

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Doc Martens & Red Laces.

Doc Martens & Red Laces.
Every culture has their secret codes and uniforms. Some are totally obvious and overt but most are less obvious and esoteric. Doc Martens, the classic U.K. boot, has been a favorite shoe across most of the punk spectrum. Did you know lace colors are a code? This is true and well documented. Red laced DM's are commonly associated with Anti-Racist punk groups. These folks generally have shaved heads and are often unfortunately confused with their awful, equally bald, opposites. Interesting little fact about vintage footwear. There's so much in our wardrobes. Continue reading

The Windbreaker.

The Windbreaker.

The Windbreaker. Favored by your Grandma, your Dealer, and your Coach.

What other garment ticks all those boxes, huh?

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The Clean Car Air Race of 1970.

The Clean Car Air Race of 1970.
Way back in 1970, a group of college students attempted to build cleaner, greener cars than Detroit was able to produce at the time. (Think living green is a 21st century thing, do ya?) Earth Day was a year old, and all auto-makers were balking the recently passed Edmund Muskie Clean Air Act - which required those car manufacturers to reduce emissions by 90 percent. (Their complaint was they couldn't.) This tee is a piece of early green history that was way ahead of its time. Never underestimate young students who are willing to take on the world. Continue reading

Denim Details.

Denim Details.

A true-vintage piece from our stock. Sold. Buy fewer, better things.

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Ametora.

An excerpt from forthcoming Spring 2020 FM/AM Magazine article. The Japanese vintage market has been strong for over 40 years. It is no secret that the Japanese adore American vintage clothing and are willing to go great lengths to source the absolute best pieces. American traditional style, from Champion Reverse Weave sweats to Levis denim, evolved out of necessity. Home spun fibers and natural materials sewn together to be durable and made to last used to be a normal thing. Kids went shopping at the beginning of the school year with the mindset to make whatever they were lucky enough to receive last the entire year. That’s a lot of baseball games, school dances, 4-H contests, after school jobs, sporting events and weekend fun. These clothes had to make it through all of that. Same for adults - a quality chore jacket and a keen wool sweater both had to make it through more than one season. Clothing, after all, was expensive. For this conversation you can lump those generations - the 1940s, 50s, 60s, 70s into one group. This was the manufacturing peak of what is considered ‘American Traditional style.’ The best denim was made then. They best suits. The coolest Converse sneakers. The best leather jackets. It was all good. And the post WWII Japanese took notice. Quality is what is most important when seeking vintage clothing. Hold a 1960’s Levi’s BIG E jacket and then hold one made today - they’re different. Really different. A culture that respects materials and has senses of place will naturally find the beauty in a well made garment. Intrinsic wabi-wabi qualities like a perfectly sharpened crease, gently worn button holes, and the value of a sun faded sweatshirt are key components to the Japanese vintage collector. However, there are some who value pristine, untouched vintage in high regard..... The Article will be published in full next year. Continue reading

Van Life.

Van Life.

Mia & Zoe for The Clothing Warehouse. 2019.

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Fashion As Design.

What We Wear - How We Wear It - Why We Wear It - What It Means - How It's Made.

These five simple questions are more important now than they ever have been before. Life has become a system of mass-identification rituals. Group-likes, viral-trends, social-shames - whatever. We have flooded the internet with our 'individual expressions.' Back in the day, it used to be important to watch the the cool folks start new trends INDIVIDUALLY. Now we watch and see who the 'early adopters' are and who's 'dressing like so & so' before everyone else, eventually, does, too.

Sounds, boring, to me.

So let's think. Who are you? What do you want to tell the world? How are you able to do that? Here's two quick examples:

Eco-conscious young folks can all be seen wearing the same brands, for the same reasons (functional, fashionable, trendy) - recycled, sustainable manufacturers etc. Denim-Dudes (and Dudettes) hunt out those 19.5oz chore jeans and brass chain-wallets - functional, fashionable, trendy - made in USA, natural materials, long lasting product etc.

Just a little lo-fi thought food for you all.

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