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Vintage Clothing Trends

70's Attitude.

70's Attitude.

70's styled photo session with racheldemsickphoto.com

Vintage is always in fashion. It's the way to say a mouthful while staying silent.

Let your style do the talking.

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Gold In Our Bins.

Gold In Our Bins.

Our bins are restocked every week. There's gold in there. You can smell it.

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The Vintage 'Archive.'

Do you have a vintage 'archive?' You know what I'm talking about - that box under your bed filled with vintage pieces you simply cannot part with. I've heard about archives of all sizes over the years. Even met a guy who had an entire vacant house filled with vintage items he collected that just, weren't, for, sale. To anyone. Ever.

I think this is a good practice. We all follow the trends and the #feeds, but the key to style is to be yourself. There's such a sense of over-identification anymore and that's basically, well, unoriginal. Collect and (hopefully) wear whatever you want - even if it's too small or too big for you.

 

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Vintage Squad.

Vintage Squad.

Vintage + Summer = good times. A shot from one of our recent photo spreads.

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Shake it.

Shake it.

Double vintage. Vintage camera. Vintage Film. Vintage Clothing. Recent photo shoot.

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Summer Heat.

Summer Heat.

A quick behind the scenes film shot from one of our recent photo shoots. Damn it's hot out.

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Fabric Consideration.

Quality (Old) Fabrics Vs New Fabrics Last week, a customer commented that older fabrics have a different feel than what most folks are used to feeling when shopping for contemporary clothing. Sounds like a simple observation, but oh no, there’s more to that thought than you think. The ‘hand’ of any fabric - the way it feels to the touch - is important. Cotton can be crisp, silky, soft, heavy, scratchy, and any combination of the above. Think of your sheets and how they feel when freshly laundered. Or how that tee felt when you first touched the sleeve on some junk store Z-rack. Textiles used to be one of the most prized items in any household. Exotic silks, meticulous embroideries, and durable cottons were literally handed down between generations and held in high regard as heirlooms. Things of importance and wealth. These generations paid attention to craftsmanship and materials and labor and time. It wasn’t so long ago that this was a common belief. A great example is the quilts made by the women of Gee’s Bend, Alabama, who are famously known for reassembling the family’s worn out denim workwear into fantastic geometric fabrics that are sought by both collectors and curators from the textile industry. Those garments were given respect. They were treated with care. Unfortunately most modern folks don’t know the difference between a quality garment, one made with superior fabrics, because good goods aren’t as readily available as they once were. This has nothing to do with quality control or availability of materials - the issue lies solely within our economy. Raw denim (cotton) made from pure fibers, unadulterated by chemical treatments or stiffeners or additives costs a lot more than the cheap synthesized stuff. Been to a store lately looking for a pair of jeans? You’ll find every pair has at 2% spandex in the weave. I will say that most people can appreciate quality garments but when you confront them with the decision between backing a well made (expensive) piece of clothing and offering them something cheap, they’re going to pick the cheap option. And this is our problem with nearly everything - keep making more cheap stuff, keep buying more cheap stuff, keep spending money, keep making trash, and on and on and on. Do people actually want quality clothing? Do they even miss that component of daily life? Certainly a difficult question to solve with a simple answer. Continue reading

SUKAJAN

SUKAJAN
A reversible, silk Sukajan with double Sky Dragon & Tiger embroidery. (From the TCW Collection)
The Sukajan jacket is not a simple souvenir. Born from American G.I.’s bringing them back home as gifts, the Sukajan morphed into a symbol of post World War II Japanese youth rebellion and has become a modern fashion icon. The term “Sukajan” has loose origins but we can narrow it down to something meaning close to ‘Sky Dragon Jumper’ - or just ‘jumper’ - a reference to wartime parachute servicemen. The jackets are defined by their materials and style: Silk, embroidery and cut like a baseball uniform jacket. They’re bold. They’re bad. They say something. Originally designed for American export, these have since interestingly been co-accepted by the Japanese market. The 1960’s Japanese market initially associated the Sukajan with cultural rebellion, juvenile delinquency and gangs. This attitude has since faded as new conflicts diluted the market - the Korean War and Vietnam - with new designs and slogans changing the way the jackets were received. Sukajans have been worn by everyone - Mick Jagger likes to wear them when touring. Ryan Gosling wore one in the film Drive (2011). Kurt Russell wore a Sukajan variation as Stuntman Mike in Grindhouse (2007). Sukajan should be carefully chosen - especially vintage pieces. Many of these were designed with intention to convey a message of sacrifice and experiences of war. Continue reading

WWII Hand Painted Bomber Jacket

WWII Hand Painted Bomber Jacket
A "Trunk's Up" WWII leather and shearling bomber from our collection at The Clothing Warehouse.
Pilots and Airmen believed in decorating their flight issue jackets with various themes. The number of missions one may have completed (or ongoing) was a common idea. Also the number of kills or anti-enemy propaganda was prevalent. Rarely do you see a simple message like the one above from our collection. Many cultures use elephant iconography for property and good fortune. Posing an elephant with its 'trunk up' is a sign wishing for good luck and protection. No cartoon bombs or political caricatures here - simply one wish to be held in good faith during perilous missions. In this context, this jacket is more than a warm coat. It's a very powerful and memorable piece of military history. Continue reading

Halloween Costumes, Vintage Style.

Halloween Costumes, Vintage Style.
Desiree, Monica, Jen & Darryl. Hell of a party we had.

 

Halloween comes every year and every year decisions must be made - sexy ghost? Plumber? Netflix & Chill (Real thing) Where do you get such a great halloween get up? VINTAGE SHOPS, of course! A cheesy, store bought costume lacks character and originality and on the one day you're to be remembered for what you wore, why not step it up and get serious about your holiday outfit? Halloween is the night to be yourself. The night to come alive, if you will (if you're done up as a sexy Frankenstein - also, real thing). Whatever your costume idea may be, choose to shop in a good vintage shop like The Clothing Warehouse. You're guaranteed to have the most original get up on the block, the office, parade or party. Vintage gear is sustainable, looks cooler and can be recycled.

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