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Vintage Clothing Trends

Fashion As Design.

What We Wear - How We Wear It - Why We Wear It - What It Means - How It's Made.

These five simple questions are more important now than they ever have been before. Life has become a system of mass-identification rituals. Group-likes, viral-trends, social-shames - whatever. We have flooded the internet with our 'individual expressions.' Back in the day, it used to be important to watch the the cool folks start new trends INDIVIDUALLY. Now we watch and see who the 'early adopters' are and who's 'dressing like so & so' before everyone else, eventually, does, too.

Sounds, boring, to me.

So let's think. Who are you? What do you want to tell the world? How are you able to do that? Here's two quick examples:

Eco-conscious young folks can all be seen wearing the same brands, for the same reasons (functional, fashionable, trendy) - recycled, sustainable manufacturers etc. Denim-Dudes (and Dudettes) hunt out those 19.5oz chore jeans and brass chain-wallets - functional, fashionable, trendy - made in USA, natural materials, long lasting product etc.

Just a little lo-fi thought food for you all.

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It's Grunge Season!

It's Grunge Season!
A slightly spooky photoshoot styled from our warehouse. There's vintage gear for everyone.
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The Breakers Hotel.

The Breakers Hotel.
Vintage Breakers Employee Cabana Tees.
Henry Flagler opened The Breakers Hotel to support his newly constructed Florida East Coast Railway. In 1896 it was known as the Palm Beach Inn. Guests flocked and soon began requesting rooms with views "over the breakers (waves)" and thus, was renamed The Breakers Hotel in 1901. Rooms were $4 a night and included 3 meals a day. Presidents, dignitaries, royalty and those seeking a glimpse into that world are regular guests. Today the Breakers is one of the worlds top luxury hotels. Accommodations start well into the thousands of dollars per night. Above are three cabana-tees from the 1970's/80's. Cocktail girls and bartenders would be seen wearing these ringers. A nice piece of Palm Beach History. Continue reading

70's Attitude.

70's Attitude.

70's styled photo session with racheldemsickphoto.com

Vintage is always in fashion. It's the way to say a mouthful while staying silent.

Let your style do the talking.

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Gold In Our Bins.

Gold In Our Bins.

Our bins are restocked every week. There's gold in there. You can smell it.

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Vintage Squad.

Vintage Squad.

Vintage + Summer = good times. A shot from one of our recent photo spreads.

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Summer Heat.

Summer Heat.

A quick behind the scenes film shot from one of our recent photo shoots. Damn it's hot out.

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Fabric Consideration.

Quality (Old) Fabrics Vs New Fabrics Last week, a customer commented that older fabrics have a different feel than what most folks are used to feeling when shopping for contemporary clothing. Sounds like a simple observation, but oh no, there’s more to that thought than you think. The ‘hand’ of any fabric - the way it feels to the touch - is important. Cotton can be crisp, silky, soft, heavy, scratchy, and any combination of the above. Think of your sheets and how they feel when freshly laundered. Or how that tee felt when you first touched the sleeve on some junk store Z-rack. Textiles used to be one of the most prized items in any household. Exotic silks, meticulous embroideries, and durable cottons were literally handed down between generations and held in high regard as heirlooms. Things of importance and wealth. These generations paid attention to craftsmanship and materials and labor and time. It wasn’t so long ago that this was a common belief. A great example is the quilts made by the women of Gee’s Bend, Alabama, who are famously known for reassembling the family’s worn out denim workwear into fantastic geometric fabrics that are sought by both collectors and curators from the textile industry. Those garments were given respect. They were treated with care. Unfortunately most modern folks don’t know the difference between a quality garment, one made with superior fabrics, because good goods aren’t as readily available as they once were. This has nothing to do with quality control or availability of materials - the issue lies solely within our economy. Raw denim (cotton) made from pure fibers, unadulterated by chemical treatments or stiffeners or additives costs a lot more than the cheap synthesized stuff. Been to a store lately looking for a pair of jeans? You’ll find every pair has at 2% spandex in the weave. I will say that most people can appreciate quality garments but when you confront them with the decision between backing a well made (expensive) piece of clothing and offering them something cheap, they’re going to pick the cheap option. And this is our problem with nearly everything - keep making more cheap stuff, keep buying more cheap stuff, keep spending money, keep making trash, and on and on and on. Do people actually want quality clothing? Do they even miss that component of daily life? Certainly a difficult question to solve with a simple answer. Continue reading

How do you dress yourself? (by #wiwt or #ootd or #ofotd....)

How do you dress yourself?  (by #wiwt or #ootd or #ofotd....)
A sampling of something from our warehouse you should be wearing this summer. A future #wiwt, if you will.
What is an outfit anymore? Yeah, we're all wearing costumes and the worlds a stage to quote somebody else - but where is it going? Just about everyone has worn just about everything and the cycles are seemingly growing shorter and at a faster refresh rate. So? (you say) What does philosophy have to do with what I wear? Well, a lot actually. I'm proposing asking yourself a few questions:
  1. Do I have my own style?
  2. If I do, who/what are my icons or inspiration and why (and does that even matter)?
  3. Do I dress for occasions or always for comfort?
  4. Is this a uniform? Or is it ME? (Poodle Skirt or Business Suit, same deal.)
An afternoon spent introspectively meandering one's own psyche will likely stir-up a few ah-ha's for which you weren't quite prepared. The clothing we wear immediately says things that words cannot, before we even try to explain ourselves. Clothing can incite immediate acceptance and rejection. Some places won't even let you inside if you're dressed a certain way. Makes sense, right? Or not? What does the vintage dress/boot combo example above say about somebody? Farmers daughter? Chic Celebrity? Eccentric bike-riding barista? I guess that's always the question, isn't it? It's why we subconsciously choose outfits that match our subconscious 'personas'. Does your closet really represent who you are? :) Continue reading

SUKAJAN

SUKAJAN
A reversible, silk Sukajan with double Sky Dragon & Tiger embroidery. (From the TCW Collection)
The Sukajan jacket is not a simple souvenir. Born from American G.I.’s bringing them back home as gifts, the Sukajan morphed into a symbol of post World War II Japanese youth rebellion and has become a modern fashion icon. The term “Sukajan” has loose origins but we can narrow it down to something meaning close to ‘Sky Dragon Jumper’ - or just ‘jumper’ - a reference to wartime parachute servicemen. The jackets are defined by their materials and style: Silk, embroidery and cut like a baseball uniform jacket. They’re bold. They’re bad. They say something. Originally designed for American export, these have since interestingly been co-accepted by the Japanese market. The 1960’s Japanese market initially associated the Sukajan with cultural rebellion, juvenile delinquency and gangs. This attitude has since faded as new conflicts diluted the market - the Korean War and Vietnam - with new designs and slogans changing the way the jackets were received. Sukajans have been worn by everyone - Mick Jagger likes to wear them when touring. Ryan Gosling wore one in the film Drive (2011). Kurt Russell wore a Sukajan variation as Stuntman Mike in Grindhouse (2007). Sukajan should be carefully chosen - especially vintage pieces. Many of these were designed with intention to convey a message of sacrifice and experiences of war. Continue reading
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