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Vintage Clothing Trends

Levi's Jackets.

Levi's Jackets.
Some daily eye-candy from our showroom.  There's an entire secret history inside every Levi's denim jacket - button codes, stitching colors, pocket shapes, tags and tags.... You can discover a lot about where your jacket came from and who made it by deciphering these secret codes.  If you've got some free time you should give your jacket a second look.  You might find something surprising. Continue reading

Boots, boots and more boots

Boots, boots and more boots
Cowboy boots.  Comfort just about as good as it gets.  Be sure to wear them without irony, and get a good pair, they’ll last you for years. Continue reading

Denim Details.

Denim Details.

A true-vintage piece from our stock. Sold. Buy fewer, better things.

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Ametora.

An excerpt from forthcoming Spring 2020 FM/AM Magazine article. The Japanese vintage market has been strong for over 40 years. It is no secret that the Japanese adore American vintage clothing and are willing to go great lengths to source the absolute best pieces. American traditional style, from Champion Reverse Weave sweats to Levis denim, evolved out of necessity. Home spun fibers and natural materials sewn together to be durable and made to last used to be a normal thing. Kids went shopping at the beginning of the school year with the mindset to make whatever they were lucky enough to receive last the entire year. That’s a lot of baseball games, school dances, 4-H contests, after school jobs, sporting events and weekend fun. These clothes had to make it through all of that. Same for adults - a quality chore jacket and a keen wool sweater both had to make it through more than one season. Clothing, after all, was expensive. For this conversation you can lump those generations - the 1940s, 50s, 60s, 70s into one group. This was the manufacturing peak of what is considered ‘American Traditional style.’ The best denim was made then. They best suits. The coolest Converse sneakers. The best leather jackets. It was all good. And the post WWII Japanese took notice. Quality is what is most important when seeking vintage clothing. Hold a 1960’s Levi’s BIG E jacket and then hold one made today - they’re different. Really different. A culture that respects materials and has senses of place will naturally find the beauty in a well made garment. Intrinsic wabi-wabi qualities like a perfectly sharpened crease, gently worn button holes, and the value of a sun faded sweatshirt are key components to the Japanese vintage collector. However, there are some who value pristine, untouched vintage in high regard..... The Article will be published in full next year. Continue reading

Fashion As Design.

What We Wear - How We Wear It - Why We Wear It - What It Means - How It's Made.

These five simple questions are more important now than they ever have been before. Life has become a system of mass-identification rituals. Group-likes, viral-trends, social-shames - whatever. We have flooded the internet with our 'individual expressions.' Back in the day, it used to be important to watch the the cool folks start new trends INDIVIDUALLY. Now we watch and see who the 'early adopters' are and who's 'dressing like so & so' before everyone else, eventually, does, too.

Sounds, boring, to me.

So let's think. Who are you? What do you want to tell the world? How are you able to do that? Here's two quick examples:

Eco-conscious young folks can all be seen wearing the same brands, for the same reasons (functional, fashionable, trendy) - recycled, sustainable manufacturers etc. Denim-Dudes (and Dudettes) hunt out those 19.5oz chore jeans and brass chain-wallets - functional, fashionable, trendy - made in USA, natural materials, long lasting product etc.

Just a little lo-fi thought food for you all.

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Rolled Denim Cuff Facts.

Rolled Denim Cuff Facts.

Did you know that the rolled denim cuff originated in the cowboy days? Cowboys would store their precious belongings or small stuff that wasn't practical to be kept in saddle bags. Coins, small liquor, bottles and cigarettes were often slipped right into the rolled cuff for easy access while on horseback. There's even tales of cuffs being used as ashtrays....

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The Baja.

The Baja.
The Baja. Californian surfers brought these back from their Mexican surf trips. Over the years these ubiquitous jackets have been adopted by hippies, post-hair metal rockers, and various other sub-cultural groups. Also known as Sudadera de jerk, Continue reading

80's Attitude.

80's Attitude.

Summer 80's style from a recent TCW photo shoot.

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The Vintage Proposition.

The Vintage Proposition. (Or the modern concept value proposition) Vintage gear is getting expensive! Come on! I guess vintage threads have always been sorta expensive if you’re getting down with serious pieces. Rock tees, leather jackets, a great pair of boots - they’ll all set you back. Which is where this weeks value idea comes to play. The question of how often you’ll wear something is an easy reality - and a useful decision making tool, too. Lets say a pair of vintage jeans sets you back fifty bucks. You’ll probably wear those jeans every day for at least a year. That’s 50/365. By the math that’s a pretty cheap investment in quality and happiness. Now, a vintage rock tee may set you back two hundred bucks. And you’re likely to wear it maybe once a week. That’s 200/52. Considerably higher than those vintage Levi’s you swiped from our shop. Guess it’s really just all in the math and down to what your budget can handle. Unless there’s something so rare, so amazing and so cool that you’ll chance not paying the rent on time to have. And well, when that happens, you just gotta buy it. Continue reading

Fabric Consideration.

Quality (Old) Fabrics Vs New Fabrics Last week, a customer commented that older fabrics have a different feel than what most folks are used to feeling when shopping for contemporary clothing. Sounds like a simple observation, but oh no, there’s more to that thought than you think. The ‘hand’ of any fabric - the way it feels to the touch - is important. Cotton can be crisp, silky, soft, heavy, scratchy, and any combination of the above. Think of your sheets and how they feel when freshly laundered. Or how that tee felt when you first touched the sleeve on some junk store Z-rack. Textiles used to be one of the most prized items in any household. Exotic silks, meticulous embroideries, and durable cottons were literally handed down between generations and held in high regard as heirlooms. Things of importance and wealth. These generations paid attention to craftsmanship and materials and labor and time. It wasn’t so long ago that this was a common belief. A great example is the quilts made by the women of Gee’s Bend, Alabama, who are famously known for reassembling the family’s worn out denim workwear into fantastic geometric fabrics that are sought by both collectors and curators from the textile industry. Those garments were given respect. They were treated with care. Unfortunately most modern folks don’t know the difference between a quality garment, one made with superior fabrics, because good goods aren’t as readily available as they once were. This has nothing to do with quality control or availability of materials - the issue lies solely within our economy. Raw denim (cotton) made from pure fibers, unadulterated by chemical treatments or stiffeners or additives costs a lot more than the cheap synthesized stuff. Been to a store lately looking for a pair of jeans? You’ll find every pair has at 2% spandex in the weave. I will say that most people can appreciate quality garments but when you confront them with the decision between backing a well made (expensive) piece of clothing and offering them something cheap, they’re going to pick the cheap option. And this is our problem with nearly everything - keep making more cheap stuff, keep buying more cheap stuff, keep spending money, keep making trash, and on and on and on. Do people actually want quality clothing? Do they even miss that component of daily life? Certainly a difficult question to solve with a simple answer. Continue reading
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